Cancer

Bladder Cancer Symptoms & What To Watch Out For

Bladder Cancer Symptoms & What To Watch Out For

If you’re like me, the first sign of discomfort has you thinking that there might be something terribly wrong. It is good, however, to be cautious and not dismiss medical symptoms that could be telling you that you have a particular condition. At the very least, you can discuss the symptoms with your doctor, especially if the symptoms together spell out bad news.

It’s important to know what symptoms to look out for when it comes to developing cancer of the bladder, especially as you get older. Certain cancer symptoms throw up red flags immediately, such as when you notice there is blood in your urine. Bloody urine doesn’t necessarily mean you have bladder cancer, but it is a symptom, and you’re likely to get that type of symptom checked out immediately.

Do you find yourself going to the bathroom more often than usual? Do you feel pain when urinating? How about those times that you go to the bathroom even when your bladder isn’t full, yet you feel the need to go right then. As you can see, some of these minor symptoms could be anything, but together, they can spell out for you that you need to see a doctor and have the symptoms assessed to see if it’s possible you do have bladder cancer.

If bladder cancer progresses, you could experience even worse symptoms, and so you don’t want to wait for things to get worse. You might not be able to urinate at all, your feet and even your bones might ache, and you would start losing weight and feel like you’re not hungry.

Early detection is very important when it comes to any type of cancer, and so cancer of the bladder is no different. Be mindful of these irritating symptoms, and don’t just dismiss them as nothing serious.

As seen on cancercareging.com

What is Cervical Cancer in a Few Words

What is Cervical Cancer in a Few Words

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the cervix of a woman which is the entrance to the vagina. It usually has no symptoms in its early stages. If symptoms do occur, they include abnormal vaginal bleeding which is rampant after sex, in between periods and after menopause.

However, having abnormal bleeding does not necessarily mean that you have contracted cervical cancer. However, it should be investigated by your doctor as soon as possible. If your doctor thinks that you have contracted the condition, then you should see a specialist immediately.

Over a period of years, the cells that form the lining on the surface of the cervix usually undergo a number of changes. In some cases the cells that were precancerous become cancerous. However, the change of the cells in the cervix can be detected at a very early stage thus treatment can be done.

Most cases of cervical cancer are usually caused by a virus known as the human papillomavirus. HPV I a very common virus that may be transmitted through sexual contact with a man or woman. The virus has hundreds of types that are harmless. However, some types may cause changes in the cervix that can result in the development of cervical cancer.

If cervical cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, it is possible to treat it through surgery. This may involve a hysterectomy whereby the womb is removed. In some cases, however, the womb does not have to be removed. An alternative for this form of treatment is radiotherapy. In most cases, it is usually used alongside surgery.

If cancer has advanced further, then it can be treated using a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, these treatments, though helpful, can have a number of significant long-lasting adverse effects such as infertility or early menopause.

Many women that contract cervical cancer will develop a number of complications. This may arise as a result of cancer or a side effect of the treatment that the woman is undergoing. Complications that are related to cervical cancer may range from relatively minor issues to very life-threatening complications. Some of these minor issues include minor bleeding from the vagina while the major issues include kidney failure and excessive bleeding.

According to research, it is possible for women of all ages to develop cervical cancer, though it mostly affects women aged between 30 and 45. If you find yourself with the symptoms that have been mentioned above, you should go for screening right away. It might just save your life.